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History 3

The Hudson Amateur Radio Council

club-qsl-card.gif The North Jersey DX Association has for many years been a member of the Hudson Amateur Radio Council, Inc. known as HARC. HARC is an organization of radio clubs in the Hudson Division, established for the better representation of the radio amateur. Its principle function appears to be the organization and management of the frequent ARRL conventions held in the Second District. Hudson Division conventions were held in November 1976 and 78 at the Playboy Club in McAfee, New Jersey and at the Pines Hotel in South Fallsburg, New York in 1980. Attendance at these meetings was said to have been in the neighborhood of four thousand. Another convention is planned for 1982 at the Americana of McAfee, formerly the Playboy Club.

Herman Musterman, W2TP, has been the principle representative of the NJDXA on the HARC Council.. He has been joined in this activity at various times by Howard Wolfe, W2AGW, Lou Amoroso, W2ZZ and Dave Beckwith, W2QM. Our current representative to HARC is Stan Owens, W2MT. "Musty," W2TP, has been elected president of the HARC Council for the year 1982. This is a well deserved tribute and acknowledgment of his dedicated service to HARC on behalf of the NJDXA>

Brother Pat's Vacuum Tubes

eimac-antenna.jpg In January 1975, Brother Patrick Dowd, W2GK our Secretary and teacher of science at Paramus Catholic High School, announced that because of the rapid obsolescence of vacuum tubes, he was starting a collection for display at the school. He said he would appreciate any tubes the members no longer needed or wanted to keep. Several boxes full of old tubes of all types were brought by members of NJDXA to the next couple of meetings.

Your Historian introduced Brother Pat to the Antique Wireless Association and to two of the leading tube collectors and historians in the country. Brother Pat also met some of the engineers and managers of the RCA Tube Works at Harrison, New Jersey. These contacts provided an entree to that plant before it closed in 1976 and made it possible for Brother Pat to make final photographic documentary of operations in the Harrison Tube Plant. When the plant closed, many tubes were turned over to Brother Pat for his collection, including the final tube made in the plant. RCA also turned over to him the master file of tube standards and manufacturing specifications, dating back to 1925, when the plant was the GE Lamp Works. These files amounted to two tons of bound volumes which are now kept by the Antique Wireless Association.

Brother Pat first made a study and collection of the metal tubes developed by GE and RCA in 1935. These were, and still are, a very rugged tube that was used extensively during World War II. He has written two or three historical monographs on these tubes and has already become the leading authority on their history. He has devised a very practical and artful method of mounting his collection of tubes and has arranged that this collection be given a permanent place in the engineering library of Manhattan College in New York City. The collection now includes forty panels, including tubes from one of the earliest, made by DeForest in 1907, to ceramic transmitting tubes and small TV camera tubes of the present day. He almost certainly had the most significant and complete collection of television camera tubes in the world.

The Story of the Three Gavels

The NJDXA, like most other organizations, has a gavel for the current president to use to control meetings. Unlike other organizations, however, the NJDXA has three gavels, symbols of the office of president.

The first gavel was presented to an early NJDXA president, Tom Winternitz, W2MS by the radio club of Bermuda. Tom frequently went to Bermuda for vacations and operated in the Bermuda DX Contest. He held a Bermuda call for a while but your historian cannot recall what it was. Suffice to say the members of the Bermuda club appreciated Tom's efforts on their behalf and gave our club its first official gavel.

The second gavel is constructed in the form and color of a Z-144 RF choke, It consists of a series of green coils with silver ends. This gavel represented the radio technology associated with our members and was constructed by a member, Charlie Rogers, W2AIW (SK)

The third gavel was presented as a gift to NJDXA member Ron Levy, K2CO in 1990. It was made by Benny Wyantea in Indonesia. Benny and Ron met several times on the morning DX Net run by NJDXA member Ed Berzin, W2MIG (SK). When Benny learned that Ron had just been elected president of the NJDXA, he sent his home-made gavel as a gift.

As we change administrations periodically, the gavels are handed down from president to president. They represent symbols of our leadership in amateur radio in the realm of DX.